Wednesday, May 17, 2006

 

The Poor Man's Edward Copeland

By Josh R
Greetings to everyone out there in the blogosphere — this is Edward Copeland’s faithful sidekick Josh R, whom you may or may not know depending on whether or not you’ve had the patience to get through any of the ridiculously long-winded, mostly derivative yet occasionally insightful posts and comments I’ve left on this site.

As some of you are doubtless aware, Edward is in the process of helping to organize a memorial service for his friend Jennifer Dawson, who passed away at the end of April. This will require his full attention for the immediate future since there are many arrangements yet to be made and a very limited time frame in which to see to their completion. In the interest of keeping this blog up and running, he’s called me in as a pinch-hitter to do a few posts and keep members of his loyal audience — whose participation on this site has been greatly appreciated by him since he began this enterprise, and a particular comfort to him in the past few weeks — entertained in his absence.

I’m no Edward Copeland, but I’ll do my best to keep things interesting. By the time the rightful proprietor of this site is ready to take back the reigns, I expect he will find it necessary to call upon all his friends to circle the wagons and help wrest control away from the monster he’s created. I’m feeling drunk with power even as I write this. Be afraid, Copeland….be very afraid….

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Comments:
Welcome Josh R, glad you are filling in for Mr. Copeland. I have always enjoyed your comments. Your prose is Ginsu-sharp. Why, I remember when it sliced cleanly through Hitchcock's Rebecca and then clearly reflected both halves. Afterwards, I saw it cut through a tomato. On top of that, I usually learn something when you comment. You sure know your stuff. I'd wish you luck, but I don't think you'll need it.
 
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